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COMPARE: ASTURIAS BY I. ALBENIZ INTERPRETED BY Y. KERTSOPOULOS WITH FOUR DIFFERENT AESTHETICS

YORGOS KERTSOPOULOS - GUITARIST, LUTHIER, STRING CONSTRUCTOR, RESEARCHER, AUTHOR

YORGOS KERTSOPOULOS - GUITARIST, LUTHIER, STRING CONSTRUCTOR, RESEARCHER, AUTHOR
PHOTO PUBLISHED BY "EPIKAIRA" MAGAZINE OF THE WIDE CIRCULATION SUNDAY'S GREEK NEWSPAPER "KYRIAKATIKI" ("ELEFTHEROTYPIA") ON A FOUR PAGE ARTICLE CONCERNING "KERTSOPOULOS AESTHETICS", 6 MARCH 1994, ISSUE 152

Tuesday, April 6, 2010

Excerpts from "A Little About Kertsopoulos Æsthetics For Guitar "- by Contrapuntist

…Throughout the history of the guitar, the number of strings has ranged from 4 to 6 courses. A course is a pair of two strings that were tuned in unison or octave. The baroque guitar had five courses. It wasn’t until the 18th and 19th centuries when the classical guitar began to resemble the modern classical guitar of today which uses six single strings. As a result, much of the guitar’s early repertoire is transcribed and arranged to fit within the current framework and “technical limits” of today’s guitars…

…I am going to tap into my personal experience as a classical guitarist for a moment. The classical guitar uses a combination of nylon and metal strings. Nylon is used for the top three with metal-wound strings used for the bottom three. As a whole, the volume the majority of guitars can project is much lower compared to other string instruments. When I performed with a violinist, my range in volume had to remain on the “louder” side. In many cases, I had to push the instrument to its limits hoping not to pop a string or pluck in a bad manner…

…The research conducted by George Kertsopoulos has simply tried to combine today’s guitar making techniques, improve upon them, and construct a series of instruments that give guitarists options to interpret older music accordingly. Classical musicians constantly debate about how older music should be performed. Should performance of music written in the 16th century sound like we are in the 16th century? Or, should musicians adapt to contemporary instruments and “modernize” interpretations of the music? This is an ongoing debate that will likely never come to end…

For reading the full article by Contrapuntist please click below:
by Contrapuntist on March 23, 2010
in Performance and Inspiration

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